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The “Paid-What-You’re-Worth” Myth

robertreich:

It’s often assumed that people are paid what they’re worth. According to this logic, minimum wage workers aren’t worth more than the $7.25 an hour they now receive. If they were worth more, they’d earn more. Any attempt to force employers to pay them more will only kill jobs. 

According to this same logic, CEOs of big companies are worth their giant compensation packages, now averaging 300 times pay of the typical American worker. They must be worth it or they wouldn’t be paid this much. Any attempt to limit their pay is fruitless because their pay will only take some other form. 

"Paid-what-you’re-worth" is a dangerous myth.  

Fifty years ago, when General Motors was the largest employer in America, the typical GM worker got paid $35 an hour in today’s dollars. Today, America’s largest employer is Walmart, and the typical Walmart workers earns $8.80 an hour. 

Does this mean the typical GM employee a half-century ago was worth four times what today’s typical Walmart employee is worth? Not at all. That GM worker wasn’t much better educated or productive. He often hadn’t graduated from high school. And today’s Walmart worker is surrounded by digital gadgets — mobile inventory controls, instant checkout devices, retail search engines — making him or her highly productive. 

The real difference is the GM worker a half-century ago had a strong union behind him that summoned the collective bargaining power of all autoworkers to get a substantial share of company revenues for its members. And because more than a third of workers across America belonged to a labor union, the bargains those unions struck with employers raised the wages and benefits of non-unionized workers as well. Non-union firms knew they’d be unionized if they didn’t come close to matching the union contracts.

Today’s Walmart workers don’t have a union to negotiate a better deal. They’re on their own. And because fewer than 7 percent of today’s private-sector workers are unionized, non-union employers across America don’t have to match union contracts. This puts unionized firms at a competitive disadvantage. The result has been a race to the bottom. 

By the same token, today’s CEOs don’t rake in 300 times the pay of average workers because they’re “worth” it. They get these humongous pay packages because they appoint the compensation committees on their boards that decide executive pay. Or their boards don’t want to be seen by investors as having hired a “second-string” CEO who’s paid less than the CEOs of their major competitors. Either way, the result has been a race to the top. 

If you still believe people are paid what they’re worth, take a look at Wall Street bonuses. Last year’s average bonus was up 15 percent over the year before, to more than $164,000. It was the largest average Wall Street bonus since the 2008 financial crisis and the third highest on record, according to New York’s state comptroller. Remember, we’re talking bonuses, above and beyond salaries.

All told, the Street paid out a whopping $26.7 billion in bonuses last year. 

Are Wall Street bankers really worth it? Not if you figure in the hidden subsidy flowing to the big Wall Street banks that ever since the bailout of 2008 have been considered too big to fail. 

People who park their savings in these banks accept a lower interest rate on deposits or loans than they require from America’s smaller banks. That’s because smaller banks are riskier places to park money. Unlike the big banks, the smaller ones won’t be bailed out if they get into trouble.

This hidden subsidy gives Wall Street banks a competitive advantage over the smaller banks, which means Wall Street makes more money. And as their profits grow, the big banks keep getting bigger. 

How large is this hidden subsidy? Two researchers, Kenichi Ueda of the International Monetary Fund and Beatrice Weder di Mauro of the University of Mainz, have calculated it’s about eight tenths of a percentage point. 

This may not sound like much but multiply it by the total amount of money parked in the ten biggest Wall Street banks and you get a huge amount — roughly $83 billion a year.  

Recall that the Street paid out $26.7 billion in bonuses last year. You don’t have to be a rocket scientist or even a Wall Street banker to see that the hidden subsidy the Wall Street banks enjoy because they’re  too big to fail is about three times what Wall Street paid out in bonuses.

Without the subsidy, no bonus pool. 

By the way, the lion’s share of that subsidy ($64 billion a year) goes to the top five banks — JPMorgan, Bank of America, Citigroup, Wells Fargo. and Goldman Sachs. This amount just about equals these banks’ typical annual profits. In other words, take away the subsidy and not only does the bonus pool disappear, but so do all the profits.  

The reason Wall Street bankers got fat paychecks plus a total of $26.7 billion in bonuses last year wasn’t because they worked so much harder or were so much more clever or insightful than most other Americans. They cleaned up because they happen to work in institutions — big Wall Street banks — that hold a privileged place in the American political economy. 

And why, exactly, do these institutions continue to have such privileges? Why hasn’t Congress used the antitrust laws to cut them down to size so they’re not too big to fail, or at least taxed away their hidden subsidy (which, after all, results from their taxpayer-financed bailout)? 

Perhaps it’s because Wall Street also accounts for a large proportion of campaign donations to major candidates for Congress and the presidency of both parties. 

America’s low-wage workers don’t have privileged positions. They work very hard — many holding down two or more jobs. But they can’t afford to make major campaign contributions and they have no political clout. 

According to the Institute for Policy Studies, the $26.7 billion of bonuses Wall Street banks paid out last year would be enough to more than double the pay of every one of America’s 1,085,000 full-time minimum wage workers. 

The remainder of the $83 billion of hidden subsidy going to those same banks would almost be enough to double what the government now provides low-wage workers in the form of wage subsidies under the Earned Income Tax Credit.

But I don’t expect Congress to make these sorts of adjustments any time soon. 

The “paid-what-your-worth” argument is fundamentally misleading because it ignores power, overlooks institutions, and disregards politics. As such, it lures the unsuspecting into thinking nothing whatever should be done to change what people are paid, because nothing can be done. 

Don’t buy it. 

“Because education = jobs (as well as income and social mobility, not to mention quality of life), it seems to me preposterous to talk responsibly of any real “equality of opportunity” without also talking about extinguishing this nation’s method of financing K-12 education—the property tax. Seldom has such an insidious joke been perpetrated on the Great American Majority, and especially the poor: while upper-middle- to upper-class public schools are showered with loot derived from their affluent physical surroundings, others must make do with the limited resources derived from quite limited “estates,” which are limited, in large part, because of earlier-limited educational opportunities.”The social crime of education financing (via azspot)

(via liberalsarecool)

think-progress:

Meet the newest member of the national monument club.

think-progress:

Meet the newest member of the national monument club.

christinetheastrophysicist:

This infographic shows where in space the Department of Energy’s technology has been.

Image by Sarah Gerrity.

(via sagansense)

historical-nonfiction:

NASA helped invent cordless power tools. Why? Why would NASA be interested in home improvement? Well, they weren’t. What they wanted was a way for their astronauts to dig on the surface of the moon. For science and stuff. Back in those days power tools needed a lot more energy and no one had figured out how to make batteries big or efficient enough. But NASA wanted its moon dust, and by george it was going to get it. They teamed up with Black & Decker and soon had a battery that worked. Not only did it make tools safer and smaller, they paved the way for other battery-based tech, like ipods and cell phones.

historical-nonfiction:

NASA helped invent cordless power tools. Why? Why would NASA be interested in home improvement? Well, they weren’t. What they wanted was a way for their astronauts to dig on the surface of the moon. For science and stuff. Back in those days power tools needed a lot more energy and no one had figured out how to make batteries big or efficient enough. But NASA wanted its moon dust, and by george it was going to get it. They teamed up with Black & Decker and soon had a battery that worked. Not only did it make tools safer and smaller, they paved the way for other battery-based tech, like ipods and cell phones.

(Source: toptenz.net)

benjaminsapiens:

Fake Presidents of the United States

by Ben Riley who writes Iothera which you should read

I found these terribly amusing for some reason.

Maybe because of how comfortably they could all fit into the history of actual American presidents. 

(via cognitivedissonance)

awkwardsituationist:

from girl rising …to consider on international women’s day (and every day thereafter)

(via thepoliticalfreakshow)

“It’s hard to tell people they deserve to be poor when they’ve done everything they were supposed to do to avoid poverty: gone to college, worked 40 hours a week. A free market that fails to reward honest toil and initiative must inevitably become less free. If Americans can’t get the money and benefits they need from their employers, they will turn to the government for help. And if the government won’t help them, perhaps they’ll vote in one that will.”You Call This A Middle Class? “I’m Trying Not to Lose My House” (via azspot)

(via theliberaltony)

“Although he provided a copy of this report to Fox, he refused my request to provide it to the members of the committee.” —Congressman Elijah Cummings calls out Darrell Issa’s relationship with Fox News at House Oversight hearing  (via mediamattersforamerica)

(Source: , via recall-all-republicans)

Original 'Cosmos' series to air before new 'Cosmos' debuts

birdsy-purplefishes:

Hey! So I dunno if you guys knew but there’s gonna be a new version of Carl Sagan’s awesome Cosmos series hosted by Neil deGrasse Tyson. They’re going to re-air the original version before they show the new one though!

One of the interesting things is that Seth MacFarlane actually is an executive producer. Normally I’m not a huge fan of what he’s chosen to do with his talents but he is a talented guy and smart on some level, so I’m glad he decided to actually do something… well, good for once. I did like the "Cosmos for Rednecks" joke that he did on Family Guy!

(via cognitivedissonance)

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